The Famous Picantes and Chicha of Cuzco

By Arnold Fernandez Coraza

Time of "Picante" in the Chicheria

Time of “Picante” in the Chicheria (Fernando Delgado Aguirre)

Cuzco’s afternoons are every more beautiful as the rains get stronger. The combination of showers with son forms bars of colors we call arcoiris, or rainbow. During this time is when we are most like to see this figure that was so important to our ancestors that they venerated it.

During the afternoon, people go out to refresh their palate with a delicious Andean beverage called chicha. Both the normal corn chicha, called chicha de jora, and the version with strawberries, called frutillada, are drinks our people tend to have every day of the year. Read the rest of this entry

Cusco's Famous Dish "Chiriuchu" (Walter Coraza Morveli)

Cusco’s Famous Dish “Chiriuchu” (Walter Coraza Morveli)

By David Knowlton

Most of the dishes we take for granted originated in elite kitchens and then spread to other tables over centuries, observed Dan Jurafsky in a splendid book about language, history, and food. This got me thinking and made me wonder about Peruvian food, especially about the ordinary cooking of working class or rural peoples.

There are lots of elite-origin dishes in Peruvian cuisine, whether they originated in the country or abroad. However, the country also has a strong history of cooking among its indigenous peoples who up until recently formed the majority of Peru’s population and generally were not elites. These are the same people who domesticated the amazing array of potatoes, and other fruit and vegetables that is so celebrated today. Read the rest of this entry

Raising Cuzco’s Passion, Chicken

By Brayan Coraza Morveli

Pollo a la Brasa

Pollo a la Brasa

Both young chickens and older hens are indispensable ingredients for many of the dishes of Peruvian cuisine as well as many other products that are made from them. The sale of chicken is a big business in our markets. Its daily consumption is massive.

Who has never tasted a dish that does not have chicken as one of its ingredients?

The answer is found in each of us since the vast majority of us eat chicken at least once a week. Restaurants serve dishes made from chicken every day. Consumers in Peru like chicken.

Read the rest of this entry

The House of the Moon and the Serpent

By Walter Coraza Morveli

Amaru Marka Huasi, Temple of the Moon (Walter Coraza Morveli)

Amaru Marka Huasi, Temple of the Moon (Walter Coraza Morveli)

Cuzco’s Temple of the Moon is found alongside its ancient Inca Highway, or Qhapaq Ñan. It is considered the Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO. The road connects Cusco with Antisuyo. The site of the Temple was undoubtedly a huaca, one of the magical and sacred shrines that were very important in their time. Read the rest of this entry

The Fixed Menu for Lunch Thrills Cuzco’s People

By Brayan Coraza Morveli

Cusco's Menu List (Wayra)

Menu List in Cusco (Wayra)

Each day at midday people go to eat lunch and recover the energies they have expended during their morning at work or school. Sometimes they go home and other times they go to a close by restaurant to enjoy a meal to calm their hunger.

What they expect is to enjoy a delicious lunch, almuerzo, and to not have to eat the very same food every day. They want variety. Many people are accustomed to their family recipes and the flavor they give which one can enjoy without tiring.

At the same time each family has its recipes and flavors, the restaurants also have theirs. Many people either prefer or are accustomed to eating their noon meal in one of these places that dot Cuzco. They have many reasons for this, such as not having time to cook or to return home from work and then go back Read the rest of this entry

Saturday, People Walked to Huanca at Night

Señor de Huanca Church  (Walter Coraza Morveli)

Señor de Huanca Church (Walter Coraza Morveli)

By Arnold Fernandez Coraza

This last Saturday was the Octave, the eighth day of the feast of Cuzco’s Lord of Huanca. It was the last day to go visit this important holy patron who is located in San Salvador, outside of Cuzco on the edge of the Sacred Valley.

Many people decided to make a pilgrimage to Huanca by walking the path from Cuzco as they do every year. The departure point from which everyone leaves is located on the Plaza of San Jeronimo, a suburban district of Cuzco and ancient town. Read the rest of this entry

Martin Chambi’s Cusco

By Walter Coraza Morveli

Martin Chambi Photography Exhibition

Martin Chambi Photography Exhibition

A splendid photographic exhibition can be found in the streets of Cusco.  It reminds us of Cusco from  earlier years and runs from the 19th of September through the 19th of October.

“Martin Chambi’s Cusco” is a display of 32 giant enlargements of the great native photographer’s prints which are displayed in Cusco. Read the rest of this entry

Students are Celebrated Today in Peru

Happy Students Day (Wayra)

Happy Student’s Day (Wayra)

By Arnold Fernandez Coraza

Today, the 23rd of September, Peru celebrates the Day of Students.  This is a very special day for students.  For this day they are front and center and everyone around them will give them congratulations and honor them like no other day.

Already on the day before, schools will celebrate students with small fiestas.  Professors take charge and organize dances for the fiestas.  They are the ones who dance for the students. They also organize outings so that all the students can enjoy a beautiful day in the company of their classmates and teachers with whom they spend the school year. Read the rest of this entry

Among Cuzco, Cusco, or Qosqo, I Prefer Cusco

By Donaldo Humberto Pinedo Macedo

Cusco Plaza de Armas (Walter Coraza Morveli)

Cusco Plaza de Armas (Walter Coraza Morveli)

There is a very interesting controversy about how one should spell the name of one of the most emblematic cities of Latin America.

When I was born the name was already established as Cusco. I never thought to contradict that. Then in the epoch of Daniel Estrada Perez, one of the most influential mayors we have had in this city, the name was changed to Qosqo, reclaiming Quechua pronunciation and spelling. Years later, under other governments the name returned once again to Cusco.

Read the rest of this entry

Chiles are now Grown in Peru and Exported to Mexico

By David Knowlton

If there is anything more Mexican than guajillo chiles, reddish, spicy, and yet a bit sweet, or the green fire of jalapeños I do not know what it is. Yet, if you go to a market, local or super, in Mexico to buy them, chances are they come from China or Peru.

I found this out when I went to a Mexican wholesale market here in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States, after watching a Diana Kennedy video on YouTube. Read the rest of this entry

 Page 1 of 113  1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »