K-Pop Claims Space among Cusco’s Youth

By Brayan Coraza Morveli

Holding Up Their Favorite K-Pop Groups (Brayan Coraza Morveli)w

Holding Up Their Favorite K-Pop Groups (Brayan Coraza Morveli)

K-Pop is an abbreviation, yet it is hitting Cusco full on. This genre of music is more fully known as Korean popular music and includes diverse styles of music such as electronica, hip hop, rap, rock, pop, etc. It also includes dance steps that are well synchronized with singing.

The most well known groups that have large quantities of fans around the world are: Super Junior, Exo, Teen Top, Girls’ Generation,  SHINee, Sistar, TVXQ/DBSK, MBLAQ, BTS,  Big Bang, and many more groups. Read the rest of this entry

Wondrous Cuzco and Its Food: A Slide Show

By Arnold Fernandez Coraza

Adobo, Cusco's Traditional Dish

Adobo, Cusco’s Traditional Dish

The city of Cuzco is proud to be one of the wonders of the world and of our ancestors who left an amazing heritage. This makes us distinctive in this world.

Besides our history, we also have a delicious gastronomy that impresses everyone who visits our beautiful city.

I am proud to be from Cuzco and to live each day in this great city with is filled with beliefs, culture, and much happiness.
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A Piece of Inca Cuzco Throws off Its Covers

As if a carpet, the pavement was lifted and set aside. It revealed a world of tubes, a webbing for a modern city, and under that another city appeared, a glory and a problem.

Inca Cuzco lies mostly concealed by the Spanish and modern city, but work on Mantas Street recently brought it to light. It shows a fine Inca wall with stairs by the side of what was the Saphy River that now flows in an underground channel, as well as what probably was the foundations and lower wall of the Amaru Cancha. Read the rest of this entry

Raising Cuys (Guinea Pigs) in Cuzco

By Arnold Fernandez Coraza

Guinea Pics

Guinea Pics

As time goes on, guinea pig meat leaves a good impression on all who try it. It has an exquisite and unique flavor that contributes to many dishes.

Many people are dedicated to raising these animals we call cuys in our city. They must take care of them and give them adequate nutrition as well as a healthy life so that these small animals grow up healthily and are able to give that marvelous flavor when they are sacrificed and cooked. Read the rest of this entry

In Search of a Suffix and Path, More on Huachafo

Huachafos in San Blas

Huachafos in San Blas

By David Knowlton

Huachafo is a weird word, as I found out while studying its usage.

It is an adjective, though one site insists it is a noun. As a result it occupies a very strange place as one of a very small set of words in Spanish ending with “-fo” that are adjectives.

In fact, the only other member of that set that I have found is fofo, a much older and very Spanish word which basically means spongy or not good. That word is also far more used and in far more countries.

Despite these two words, there appears to be no standard suffix -fo in Spanish that makes adjectives. Both huachafo and fofo are anomalies. Read the rest of this entry

Pulling Hair, A Traditional Cure for Headache

By Walter Coraza Morveli

Woman Headache

Woman Headache

A traditional technique used by our grandparents to cure intense headaches when pills and other medicines where not available or ineffective is called chucaque, also spelled chukake.

The grandparents say that the strong ache or pain which is itself called chukake, is calles because we are exposed to the intense sun without any protection. We do not put on any hat or cap to cover our head. When people have this ache you can see that their hair is stuck flat against the head. Read the rest of this entry

Drinks for the Day’s Heat and Its Cold

By Brayan Coraza Morveli

Drinking a Glass of Corn Chicha (Walter Coraza Morveli)

Drinking a Glass of Corn Chicha (Walter Coraza Morveli)

With climate change our weather is different every year from what it was in the past. The year’s seasons show greater fluctuation. This is more visible in some areas of the world than in others. In many cases it is causing economic and social damage.

Still, the cold in the Andes blows from corner to corner from dusk. It leaves tracks of frost on roofs, grass, water, and even on our streams. They change from a liquid state to solid. Our rocky hills get painted like snowy peaks, as if this were in style. Read the rest of this entry

By Arnold Fernandez Coraza

Crowds Make Thievery Possible (Wayra)

Crowds Make Thievery Possible (Wayra)

I ran into a friend yesterday and we talked about how crime has increased in our city , compared with earlier years.  We did not used to hear so much about robberies and murders in the news.  Everything was more tranquil and people lived a life with fewer risks

Now we hear about crimes every day, it seems, that fill us with anxiety. They also make us worried about going out at night because of a lack of security.  Even in the day time there are concerns. There are delinquents in the street who look to get easy money, whether through trickery with cell phones or electronic apparatuses which appear to be messed up. It seems there are always new tricks and forms of fraud. Read the rest of this entry

When Should You Eat?

Peruvian Classic Lomo Saltado

Peruvian Classic Lomo Saltado

By David Knowlton

What time do you eat your main meal of the day? Surprisingly, this can vary a lot, even within the same country or city.

In Peru, the people on the coast such as those in Lima, tend to eat their largest meal in the middle of the afternoon, around three pm or so, not unlike they do in Mexico City or in Seville.

However in the highlands, such as in Cuzco, people will eat much earlier. Even if restaurants are more attuned to something in between the mountain norm and that of the coast, many people expect their main meal around noon. Read the rest of this entry

The Best Street for Food, San Agustin

By David Knowlton

A Wonderful Salad at Le Soleil (Walter Coraza Morveli)

A Wonderful Salad at Le Soleil (Walter Coraza Morveli)

A large array of restaurants in Cuzco awaits you, from fine dinning to more rustic fare, from carefully planned creations by named chefs to fast food and street food. However, not all the streets are created equally for food offerings. None surpasses San Agustin street.

This narrow run, ensconced between Inca stone and colonial walls runs two blocks from the historically important Limacpampa Chico Square to Ruinas street, just off Cuzco’s Plaza de Armas, its main square. San Agustin is centrally located and holds a range of hotels and hostels, from some of the finest to some very simple and inexpensive places. Read the rest of this entry

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