Six Desserts and Companions Needed for Holy Week

By Arnold Fernadez Coraza

Special Desserts on Holy Week (Photo: Walter Coraza Morveli)

Special Desserts on Holy Week, Maicillos, Condesas, and Suspiros (Photo: Walter Coraza Morveli)

Holy Week is in full bloom now in the city of Cuzco. It began with Palm Sunday. Holy Monday was lived in the procession where the bulk of the people of Cuzco appeared in the Plaza to greet the Lord of Temblors.

When the procession was beginning rain began to fall. People thought it would pass and they continued to follow the Lord. Then, the heavens opened and a torrential rain fell on the city. All those who were accompanying the Lord got wet and yet still the continued in order to receive his blessing. Read the rest of this entry

Fish and Sea Food Make Holy Week

Sea Food for Holy Week (Photo: Walter Coraza Morveli)

Sea Food for Holy Week (Photo: Walter Coraza Morveli)

By Brayan Coraza Morveli

As we know, in the Christian world Holy week remembers the passion and death of Jesus. It also commemorates the twelve disciples through our food in Cuzco since we consume twelve dishes during this time.

Fish is the most consumed meat these days. In Holy Week eating red meat is banned. As a result, fish becomes ideal and is in high demand these days. Read the rest of this entry

Holy Week in Cuzco

By Arnold Fernadez Coraza

Holy Week in Cuzco (Photo: Walter Coraza Morveli)

Holy Week in Cuzco (Photo: Walter Coraza Morveli)

Holy week has arrived in the city of Cuzco. It is a celebration we do each year on a floating Schedule following the lunar calendar. The celebration begins with Palm Sunday and finishes with the Sunday of Resurrection, one week later.

During that week, every day is considered holy. During these days people in the city are expected to not eat dishes with meat. Families go shopping, beginning on Holy Monday, to buy foods that they need to prepare their popular twelve dishes of Holy Week, and on Holy Friday they serve them, although the be fair some people serve them on Thursday. Read the rest of this entry

Ayni and Cuzco’s Lord of Temblors

The Lord of the Earthquake Procession During Yesterday (Photo: Walter Coraza Morveli)

The Lord of the Earthquake Procession Yesterday (Photo: Walter Coraza Morveli)

By David Knowlton

Cuzco lived the most sacred moment of its year yesterday. The much venerated Lord of Temblors made his once a year journey out of the Cathedral to follow a path that took him to many of the old city’s most significant parishes before returning at dusk to his sanctuary.

Already people were in high ritual mode. The other patron saints of the city’s parishes had themselves gone to spend time in the Cathedral consulting and socializing with the senior of the city’s holy patrons. As a result, the city’s confraternities devoted to each, as well as all the ones organized around the lord of Temblors (el Señor de los Temblores) were in action, present and accounted for. Read the rest of this entry

On Holy Monday the Lord of Temblors Comes Out

By Brayan Coraza Morveli

Holy Monday, Lord of the Earthquake Procession (Photo: Walter Coraza Morveli)

Holy Monday, Lord of the Earthquake Procession (Photo: Walter Coraza Morveli)

After Palm Sunday in Cuzco, Holy Monday is an important day at the level of religious faith, but it is even more in Cuzco since it reminds us of a terrible incident that took place in the city many years ago.

The earthquake of 1650 destroyed much of the city, temples among the houses and public buildings. The earth would not quit shaking and with faith people brought out images of Virgins and saints to try to calm the earth with prayer. But the earth continued its shaking. Read the rest of this entry

Passion and Ritual Take Over Cuzco

By David Knowlton

Wheat Sheaves for Holy Week (Photo: Walter Coraza Moreli)

Wheat Sheaves for Holy Week (Photo: Walter Coraza Moreli)

Cuzco is a city of ceremonies. Every week, all year round, it seems something is going on somewhere in this vast place and often, especially on Sundays dances and processions claim the main square, the ceremonial center of the modern city.

It is also a modern city with a modern economy, heavily focused on tourism, regional trade, and education. Nevertheless, the ceremonies, themselves, with all the preparation, costumes, food, and drink probably claim an important part of the economic movement of the city, either through direct expenditure or indirectly as representations and enablers of businesses, markets, guilds, schools, Cuzco’s government, the Church, and so on. Read the rest of this entry

Photos and Holy Week in Cuzco

Holy Week Photography Exposition by Haynanka (Photo: Walter Coraza Morveli)

Holy Week Photography Exposition by Haynanka (Photo: Walter Coraza Morveli)

Before holy week arrives in Cuzco, there is a good photography exposition in the main plaza that you should not miss.

Haynanka is a team which shows art and photography. With these great photographs  they want to   remind us of the last path of the Lord of the Earthquake. Read the rest of this entry

Viewing Inca Cuzco

Many Places are Still Visible for those Who Have Eyes to See, A Huaca Above Cuzco.

Many Places are Still Visible for those Who Have Eyes to See, A Huaca Above Cuzco (Photo: Walter Coraza Morveli).

By David Knowlton

Cuzco impresses visitors, though it is a shadow of its former glory. Unlike another imperial capital, Rome, it does not lie under and along side a modern national capital with all the drama and energy of the state. It is a regional capital, lacking the movement and ceremony of Lima. Also unlike Rome, its ancient glory is not as visible nor seemingly as magnificent. Read the rest of this entry

Graffiti Blossoms in Cuzco

By Walter Coraza Morveli

An Andean Man Playing a Sampoña. Totorapachca, San Blas, Cuzco.

An Andean Man Playing a Sampoña. Totorapachca, San Blas, Cuzco.

Graffiti is an fascinating art which is growing in the city of the incas little by little with the inspiration of the Cusqueños, the people of Cuzco

Painting and drawing in the walls is getting more attention in Cuzco. Young teenagers specially from 15 to 20 years old. who want to show their life style and express their opinion create graffiti. This city shows different graffiti styles according to specific activities. They could be drawings, paintings, and tags of sports fans. At the same time other aspects of urban culture appear in the Imperial city, such as hip hop and break dance as well as others. Read the rest of this entry

Manna Claims Cuzco

Mana, Would You Like to Try One?

Mana, Would You Like to Try One?

By Brayan Coraza Morveli

Grains abound in the city of Cuzco, not only is it rich in monuments and archeological abundance, it also has many cereals. As a consequence there are many street sides and corners, as well as occasional stands where toasted as well as popped grains are offered. We call all these popped grains, and more, maná or manna. They include popped giant grains of corn, popped rice, popped quinoa, and even popped macaroni (though it is not a grain). Read the rest of this entry

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