Archive for April, 2012

Kukuly Restaurant: A Nook of Delights

Kukuli Restaurant

Kukuli Restaurant

By Walter Coraza Morveli (translated by David Knowlton)

A welcoming place with good energy,  Kukuly Restaurant sits three blocks above the main plaza  and offers not only a calm, inviting place, but good and inexpensive food.  Kukuly blends an international flavor with local roots. Read the rest of this entry

San Blas’ Handicraft Fair

San Blas’ Handicraft Fair

San Blas’ Handicraft Fair

By Hebert Edgardo Huamani Jara (translated by David Knowlton)

One Saturday I went to the ancient neighborhood of San Blas, known for its handicrafts.   As I walked through its zigzagging streets I was enchanted with the colonial houses raised on Inca walls that are still visible.   Its blue balconies shine from brightly colored geraniums in terracotta pots. Read the rest of this entry

Potato Flower

Potato Flower

Potato Flower

By David Knowlton

“La Flor de Papa” is a cheeky song considered folklore which is very widely known in Cuzco.  Though ostensibly simple and flirtatious, as well as a tad arrogant as befits a certain masculinity, the song is worth a detailed look.   Here it is in translation, followed by a small discussion.

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Cuzco’s Wondrous Variety of Breads

Huaro Bread for Sale

Huaro Bread for Sale

By Walter Coraza Morveli (translated by David Knowlton)

Cuzco consumes a lot of bread and that bread is still made artisanally and often in traditional ovens.  There is not just one kind of bread in Cuzco, but a whole range.  They are far more than food, they each have their distinctive taste and have, as a result, different uses according to the occasion.  Read the rest of this entry

Huacas in Cuzco

Huaca Señor de Tetecaca

Huaca Señor de Tetecaca

By Hebert Edgardo Huamani Jara (translated by David Knowlton)

On waking, I jumped from my bed, put on my running shoes and left.  I wanted to run up the side of the highway that climbs out of the city of Cuzco to the archeological complex of Sacsayhuaman.  But halfway there, my legs churning, I decided instead to race up what’s called the “Capac Ñan,” The old Inca highway.  With every step I was struck by the beautiful green covering filled with ancient stones called “huacas”.  They filled me with strong natural energy and gave me peace. Read the rest of this entry

Bembos in Cuzco

Huachana Sandwich with French Fried and Soda

Huachana Sandwich with French Fries and Soda

By David Knowlton

The Haucaypata, Cuzco, the main square where idols from all over the empire would be set in a coat of sand that covered the entire square while chicha was offered and other ritual performed, now offers a range of international fast food.  But the first was Bembos with its Peruvian themed hamburgers. Read the rest of this entry

The Potato in Cuzco

Potatoe From Cuzco

Potato From Cuzco

By Walter Coraza Morveli (translated by David Knowlton)

The potato is the most important crop for Peruvian cuisine since it cannot be missing from almost any meal.  It is also quite colorful, coming in a whole range of colors and varieties, some yellow, some white, some with dark lines, and others purple. Read the rest of this entry

Ceviche Time in America? Mexican Zings Peru

Ceviche Mixto, Cuzco

Ceviche Mixto, Cuzco

By David Knowlton

Peruvian food has claimed more fans in the United States. Its promotors, such as celebrity chef Gastón Acurio, hold it can follow the path of Mexican food to claim a place in the palate and hearts of Americans. But on Monday the acclaimed North American writer and historian of Mexican food in the fifty states, Gustavo Arrellano, argued “Peruvian food won’t happen.” Let’s take a look at Arrellano’s stance. Read the rest of this entry

Much More than a Seed: Quinoa in Cuzco

Quinua

Quinoa

By Hebert Edgardo Huamani Jara (translated by David Knowlton)

Though it has various spellings–quinoa, quinua, or kinwa– this seed is a grain that we in Cuzco have inherited from our ancestors which is claiming ever greater value in today’s world.  Not only do we make from it a wonderful variety of food, we also find other uses and meanings. Read the rest of this entry

Guitar by Luis Nieto Miranda

A Guitar in Song

A Guitar in Song

Cuzco’s great poet Luis Nieto Miranda captured the emotive role of the guitar in the life of his people who he and others call cholos.  It alone grasps and relays the sorrows that so often fill life around the corner from joy in the world between the indigenous and Spanish that is that of Cuzco’s “cholos”. Nieto writes directly and beautifully of the guitar and feeling in this poem that Cuzco Eats presents in translation. Read the rest of this entry

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